Stacking Blocks

Speech Language Pathology

Our Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP) team assesses, diagnoses, and provides treatment for a wide variety of communication disorders. Speech-Language Pathologists work collaboratively with families to create an individualized treatment plan to improve a child’s ability to communicate effectively and efficiently across a variety of settings and situations. A child with a communication challenge may have difficulty producing speech sounds correctly, putting speech sounds together, speaking fluently, understanding language, producing correct word and sentence structures, organizing language, and interacting with the appropriate social language skills. Therapy with our speech-language pathologists focuses on enhancing a child’s communication skills in a naturalistic and positive environment so that therapy is fun and motivating!

View the tabs below for more details.

Areas addressed by our Speech-Language Pathologists

Speech

Speech generally refers to how we say sounds and put sounds together in words. Speech includes abilities to produce speech sounds correctly and clearly and combine speech sounds together with ease. Acquisition of speech sounds and the path to accurate word production is developmental. A child may present with a speech sound disorder when their errors are not typical or persist past developmental age expectations.

Speech sound disorders include:

  • Articulation Disorder

  • Childhood Apraxia of Speech

  • Phonological Disorder

Would my kid benefit from this service?

Children with a speech disorder may:

  • Have difficulty being understood by others

  • Have difficulty saying words and sounds correctly

  • Use sounds and words inconsistently

  • Not produce any speech sounds

Resources

 
 

Expressive & Receptive Language

Expressive language refers to the ability to use words to communicate needs and ideas. This includes using the correct vocabulary, word tenses, sentence structures, and organized language in order to express themselves. Receptive language refers to the ability to understand language. This includes understanding what words mean, comprehending stories/information, attending to and retaining language with increased complexities, and following directions.

Would my kid benefit from this service?

Children with an expressive language disorder may:

  • Not use words to express their wants and needs

  • Have difficulty with nonverbal language such as gestures and facial expressions

  • Have difficulty with word tenses such as past tense and future tense

  • Have difficulty producing correct word and sentence structures

  • Not have an expansive vocabulary

  • Have difficulty describing and telling organized stories

 

Children with a receptive language disorder may:

  • Have difficulty understanding directions

  • Have difficulty understanding meanings behind words

  • Have difficulty understanding stories

  • Have difficulty understanding word and sentence structures

  • Have difficulty understanding questions

*This is not an all inclusive list. If you have questions, give us a call!

Resources

Pragmatic Language

Pragmatic language refers to social communication. We use both nonverbal and verbal social language skills every day when interacting with others. Pragmatic language is crucial for our ability to convey our intended messages and to form meaningful relationships. Nonverbal pragmatic language skills include making appropriate eye contact, using appropriate gestures for communication, and use of body language and facial expressions to convey and respond to messages. Using verbal language in a social setting includes appropriate greetings, answering and producing social questions, and the ability to continue conversations.

Would my kid benefit from this service?

Children with a pragmatic language disorder may:

  • Have inconsistent eye contact

  • Appear to have a flat facial expression during conversation

  • Have difficulty understanding and identifying emotions

  • Not use appropriate body language such as turning away from the person they are speaking with

  • Not maintain appropriate distance when speaking with someone

  • Have difficulty engaging in and continuing conversations

  • Have difficulty seeing others’ points of view

  • Have difficulty taking turns

*This is not an all inclusive list. If you have questions, give us a call

Resources

 

Fluency

Fluency refers to the ability to speak smoothly and easily without any disruptions. A fluency disorder is also known as “stuttering.” Stuttering may include tension and negative feelings about talking due to disfluencies.

Would my kid benefit from this service?

Children with a fluency disorder may:

  • Repeat parts of words or sentences

  • Stretch a sound out for a long period of time

  • Have difficulty getting a word or sound out and appearing to be “stuck”

  • Show secondary behaviors such as eye blinking or facial tension when having difficulty with a word

  • Avoid saying specific words or sounds that cause disfluency

*This is not an all inclusive list. If you have questions, give us a call

Resources

 
 

Voice

Voice refers to the quality, pitch, and loudness levels we use when speaking. A voice disorder is when the use of voice is atypical and interferes with communication abilities.

Would my kid benefit from this service?

Children with a voice disorder may:

  • Have breathiness, raspiness, or strain when speaking

  • Have a voice volume that is too loud or too soft

  • Have a pitch that is too high or too low for their age

  • Lose their voice frequently

*This is not an all inclusive list. If you have questions, give us a call

Resources

Augmentative & Alternative Communication

Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) is the use of alternative forms of communication other than oral speech to communicate. Children who are unable to express their wants and needs verbally may require AAC to communicate effectively. Types of AAC include picture communication, core vocabulary boards, and voice outputted devices.

Would my kid benefit from this service?

Children in need of AAC may:

  • Have difficulty with verbal communication

  • Need a reliable means to communicate wants and needs

*This is not an all inclusive list. If you have questions, give us a call!

Resources